The Ohio Scientific Inc C2-4P, serial number 3441.

This was one of the first "easy" to use computers made. It came pretty much complete with every thing that you need to get started. Having BASIC stored in a ROM chip was a new invention. Up until this time, most computers had to be loaded with a long boot process involving tapes and operator entered HEX codes.

This is the back of the C2-4P. The jacks on the right are for the video out and cassette tape interface. The blob under the duct tape is a TTL to TV signal converter. The original monitor was a RCA B&W TV tuned to channel 33.
You probably can't read the screen. The bold numbers are my responses. It says:

C/W/M ? (this means cold/warm/machine)

MEMORY SIZE? 8 (my mistake)

TERMINAL WIDTH? 80

?0- ERROR

MEMORY SIZE? 8096 (this is ACTUAL bytes, not Megs)

TERMINAL WIDTH? 40

7327 BYTES FREE

OSI 6502 BASIC VERSION 1.0 REV 3.2

COPYRIGHT 1977 BY MICROSOFT CO.

OK

That's the boot process. It's sort of funny, at this time it was "MICROSOFT CO." and the BASIC interpreter was the only thing that they sold. If you booted "machine" you were put in a raw machine mode where you entered actual machine code instructions in hexadecimal.

An ad from 1978 for the OSI line of computers.


Copyright © 1993-2001 by Robert Barnes

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